Summer Parenting in Texas

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Summer Parenting in Texas

summer possession in Texas

Summer Possession Options in Texas

Summer time can be a challenge or an opportunity.  In a Texas divorce, the Family Code possession schedule has one type of schedule for the school year and includes longer periods of time with each parent for the summer.  And, if the schedule the Family Code contains doesn’t look like it is going to work for you and your kids, there are other options available.

Standard Summer Possession

With a Standard Possession Summer Schedule, the possessory parent chooses thirty days in one block or 2 blocks of time with the thirty days divided between the two blocks of time.  The time can start as early as right after school ends.  It can end as late as a week before school starts back up again.  There are specific deadlines to choose and notify the other parent in April.  And, the managing parent can see the child during the other parent’s time and have a longer period with the child also.  There are deadlines and notices built in to the standard language for that too.

Alternating Weeks in the Summer

Sometimes, long block of times aren’t the best choice for particular kids and families.  When children are younger, it can be best for them to see each parent more frequently, for shorter periods of time.  One option for that type of schedule is to alternate weeks throughout the summer.  This can be done in 1 week or 2 week blocks of time.  Parents can decide what day works for them and the child or children to change locations based on the factors that are important to them.

Continuing the School Year Type of Schedule

On occasion, I’ve worked with parents who have decided that their circumstances work best with continuing a school year type of schedule throughout the summer with one built in longer block of time for each parent to have a vacation type of time with the kids.

As always, contact an experienced family law attorney to discuss your case and your questions.

Jill O’Connell

By | 2016-10-30T04:34:35+00:00 June 15th, 2016|Family Law, Family Life|0 Comments